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7.5919czn.bdndm
Jul 14, 2021
In General Discussions
Over the past several years, the NBA 2K series has remained at the top of the heap in the world of basketball video games, with MyCareer serving as the catalyst that propelled the series' popularity to unprecedented heights. The release of NBA 2K21 was a little out of the ordinary, with next-generation consoles not launching until late 2020 and the game receiving an update after the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 were released, respectively. A large number of people, however, have not yet made the switch from NBA 2K22 current gen consoles. Let's take a look at a few areas where the current-generation version of the game could be improved before the release of NBA 2K22 on the Xbox One and PlayStation NBA 2K22: Here Are 5 Things We Want to See in the Current-Gen 1. Implement a modified MyPlayer builder on current-generation hardware. The revamped MyPlayer builder in MyCareer was introduced a few seasons ago, and it has been well received. Among the most notable additions was the pie-chart system, which allowed players to create a diverse range of builds, each with its own unique skill set. Overall, it received positive feedback from the community because it allowed players to be more creative with their builds and to dominate with a variety of archetypes. Having said that, after a few seasons, the novelty of NBA 2K21's current-gen release appears to have worn off a little. In fact, advanced players have been using "demigod" builds that are very similar to one another to take control of the park. Furthermore, some argue that the pie-chart system is somewhat limited in terms of giving players the ability to create something that is distinct from the recognized archetypes that are available. This becomes even more apparent when we compare the player builder system of the current-gen game to the player builder system of NBA 2K21. As a result, you have much greater flexibility in designing the type of player you want in the PS5 and XSX versions, because each skill or physical ability can be assigned the exact number of attribute points that you want. Despite the fact that next-gen's builder system isn't perfect, it is a significant step in the right direction and opens the door to greater diversity. With this in mind, modifying the player builder system and expanding it to provide players with more options outside of the pie chart system may result in more interesting builds being introduced into the current-gen community. 2. An attribute rating system that rewards players for putting in the effort to improve their skills. At the moment, a player's attribute rating is strongly correlated to how much VC is spent on a skillset, as well as the type of badges that player has equipped. Although it appears to be a realistic system, it is not always the case, as the attribute ratings of players in the community may not accurately reflect that player's actual ability. By allocating the majority of their VC to their three-point shot early in the game, for example, a player can quickly improve his or her shooting ability to an above-average level rather quickly. Simply put, players who are willing to spend money can buy their way into having a high attribute rating from the start of their career. In some cases, their attribute rating does not correspond to their actual ball skills in NBA 2K21, as shown below. Occasionally, you will come across players with respectable overall ratings, in the 90-plus range, but who have a poor reputation and a poor player grade within the community. Perhaps a change could be implemented so that a player's attribute rating is directly proportional to the amount of effort they put forth in order to improve a particular skill. A system like this could make the game more realistic because, in real-life basketball, athletes improve by honing their skills and cannot expect to become a better player overnight by simply purchasing better equipment. Perhaps this could be something that encourages players to put in the necessary time and effort into skills that they want to excel at and that are compatible with their playstyle. That said, as previously stated, the pie-chart MyPlayer builder system is somewhat limited in this regard. With a system like this in place, where players earn their skills, there could be more freedom for builds to branch out beyond their core strengths and become more diverse. For example, if a paint beast or a slasher is willing to put in the effort, they can develop the ability to shoot exceptionally well from beyond the arc – rather than being limited by the pie-chart that they choose. 3. Restore NBA 2K22's affiliations to their former glory. For those who have been following the game for a while, you may recall some of the affiliations that were present in NBA 2K15 and NBA 2K16, respectively. In fact, according to reviews, those were some of the best NBA 2K titles to have been released in recent history. In particular, the affiliation with the 2K Neighborhood served as a significant motivator for participation in the community. The attendance at events such as Rival Days was consistently high, and those who took part in them were able to create some of the best in-game memories for themselves. The Neighborhood, to put it bluntly, has been a bit barren over the last few years, especially for the casual player. Open games without crews are much more difficult to find, and there is little incentive to participate in meaningful matches when there are no rivals to compete against. With the release of NBA 2K21 on next-generation consoles, affiliations made a triumphant return. They established various boroughs, each with its own distinct area, logo, and color scheme, as well as a novel warehouse court. Notably, they even allowed players to run for mayor, which has the potential to increase engagement and encourage players to work harder in order to earn a good reputation in the community. When the game first launched several years ago, the park affiliation feature was a big hit, and it may be time for the current-generation version to bring it back. Not only could this increase engagement in the community by giving you the opportunity to represent your affiliation, but it could also foster greater unity and rivalry among the participants, as well as more meaningful events in the park. 4. Players will require less virtual currency to upgrade as a result of this. Those who are new to 2K will quickly realize that virtual currency plays a significant role in the game's overall structure. You will have a difficult time progressing through the game efficiently if you do not have enough VC. Some people will be surprised to learn just how much venture capital is required to put together a respectable player in the game. It will cost approximately 185,000 VC to raise your player's overall rating from 60 to 85 points. Additionally, you will need to set aside additional VC in order to purchase advanced dunk packages, dribbling animations, clothing, and other accessories. Simply put, it could cost you anywhere between 200,000 and 250,000 VC to create a single build project. In the early stages of MyCareer, players earn approximately 500 to 1,000 VC per game, according to the numbers. This means that to reach the 185,000 VC threshold, it could take upwards of 150 games. However, even with an overall rating of 85, your player isn't exactly a star. Earning more VC for upgrades will help you get your player to 95 and higher levels of performance. Many casual gamers may have been discouraged from playing as much as they would have liked as a result of this scheme. Furthermore, many players may not be willing to put in the extra effort or money required to get their character to level 99. Possibly lowering the cost of upgrading will encourage more casual players to remain engaged with their builds, and even more willing to create new ones throughout the year. 5. Specify player tiers and overall requirements for recreational activities. Another suggestion for the wish list that could be implemented is the addition of player tiers to City, Pro-Am, and Rec Center games. Discrepancies in skill levels have been a significant issue in recreational games over the past few years. When it comes to regular Rec games, players from a wide range of skill levels are mixed together, with gaps as wide as 95 and above compared to 60 to 65 overall skills. As a result, it is not uncommon for a game to come to a close with only a handful of players still present. Players who became dissatisfied with the game quit early and allowed the AI to take over, making Rec unplayable at times. Perhaps a change to the tiers for Rec Center and Pro-Am games would be beneficial in resolving this issue. For this reason, players with similar overall ratings are only eligible to compete against each other in Boot Camp events, just as they are with other competition. This could help to close the gap between players' skill levels and make most games more competitive. This may also encourage players to stay in the game longer because they will be less likely to come up against players who are significantly better or worse than themselves.
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